Jobs and Opportunities

Special Issue “Sustainability of Carbon Capture and Utilisation”

Opportunity type: Call for journal submissions
Organisation: Sustainability journal, published by MDPI 
Location: Online
Application Deadline: Sunday 31st January 2021
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About this special issue

The ambitious target of net zero-carbon emissions by 2050, agreed by European and other countries, has now made carbon capture, utilisation and storage (CCUS) a necessity. There are mature technologies for carbon capture that have already been used for cleaning natural gas or in hydrogen production. However, mature technologies face a range of technical, environmental and economic challenges. This shortcoming is promoting research on new methods and novel technologies to capture and utilise carbon dioxide needed to overcome some of these challenges and tackle the climate change crisis. Therefore, this Special Issue of Sustainability calls for articles on emerging technologies including membranes, calcium looping, catalysed sorbents, algae-based capture, direct air capture, liquefaction and cryogenic separation, and seeks to consolidate the alternative options which face different technological challenges and are at different and/or lower technology readiness levels (TRL). Original and review articles covering the suggested areas are invited for consideration and peer-review for this Special Issue.

  • Mature and novel carbon capture technologies
  • ‘Blue’ hydrogen and CCS
  • Advances on CO2 utilisation
  • Technology assessment: economic, environmental, social
  • Education and training on sustainable carbon capture

Editors:

University Of Chester, Pool Lane, Chester CH2 4NU, UK
Interests: low carbon technologies; carbon capture; CO2 separation methods; process systems engineering
Dr. Abigail González-Díaz
Instituto Nacional de Electricidad y Energías Limpias (INEEL), Palmira 62490, Cuernavaca, Mexico
Interests: CO2 capture; CO2 utilisation, Power Plants; Biomass, Life Cycle Assessment

Closing date for receipt of applications: Sunday 31st January 2020

See manuscript submission information here

Carbon geological storage: understanding micro-mechanisms of CO2 capillary breakthrough and localized pathways to assess caprock CO2 leakage hazard – University of Strathclyde

Opportunity type: PhD
Organisation: University of Strathclyde
Location: Strathclyde, UK
Application Deadline: Friday 22nd May 2020
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Duration: 4 years

Number of places: 1

Location: Strathclyde, Scotland, UK

The development of Carbon Capture and Storage will occur at global scale, and considering the amount of CO2 that will be captured and stored underground, long-term leakage of CO2 into the atmosphere is one of the most crucial concerns for CO2 repositories.

Eligibility

We are looking for a highly motivated person to undertake multidisciplinary research. Candidates who should have a good degree in a relevant science/engineering discipline.

Project details:

The development of Carbon Capture and Storage will occur at global scale, and considering the amount of CO2 that will be captured and stored underground, long-term leakage of CO2 into the atmosphere is one of the most crucial concerns for CO2 repositories. CO2 trapping potential of these geological repositories depends on the caprock’s low permeability to CO2. Recent field experiences have highlighted one major issue: CO2 moves through the caprock barrier much faster than expected. Several studies have suggested that this could be due to chemically-induced triggering of cracking in the clay rich rock, but previous studies have not been able to understand how the chemistry of the injected fluids may affect the micro-mechanics of the. Caprock is generally characterized by the elevated presence of clayey material. Water acidification and non-polarity of the CO2 irreversibly change the electrochemical interaction forces that dominating the clay particle configuration, which can both weaken the clay and cause it to shrink, hence, CO2 intrusion results in cracking of the caprock. Our previous research 1) showed the effect on clay microstructure for different pore water chemistries and 2) formulated a micromechanical conceptual model able to account for clay particle configuration changes caused by different chemistry of pore water (pH, fluid polarity and dielectric permittivity). This PhD studentship will focus on conducting the first micro-scale experimental investigations of crack initiation in clays, to characterize the cracking micro-mechanism occurring when exposed to CO2. Research in micro-mechanics of clayey geomaterials is lagging behind granular materials owing to the difficulty of investigating particle-to-particle interaction at the microscale. Even very basic responses observed in compression are not elucidated by basic microscale mechanisms. Characterisation of localized mechanisms such as crack initiation involves the understanding of the configuration of elements (particles) and the forces controlling the kinematics of such elements. Clay micromechanics (including the evolution of particle configuration in clays when subjected to mechanical loading) has rarely been investigated explicitly, although significant aspects of the pore space and particle configuration have been addressed by microscopic analyses such mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) testing. The proposed PhD represents an exciting opportunity to conduct fundamental research, with the prospect of having a significant impact on the assessment of the long-term CO2 trapping potential.

This PhD studentship focuses on a fundamental study on cracking mechanisms in clayey caprock upon CO2 exposure, with the aim of assessing caprock long-term sealing efficiency for CCS systems. CCS was identified by the Committee on Climate Change 2018 as the “the only way to decarbonise certain key industrial sectors” in the near future.

Supervisor
First Supervisor: Dr Matteo Pedrotti

2nd Supervisor: Prof Alessandro Tarantino, Prof Rebecca Lunn

Closing date for receipt of applications: Friday 22nd May 2020

Apply here

MRes Geo-environmental Engineering- University of Strathclyde, Glasgow

Opportunity type: Postgraduate research
Organisation: University of Strathclyde, Glasgow
Location: Glasgow, UK or online distance learning
Application Deadline: August 2020
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Why this course?

This one-year MRes in Climate Change Adaptation aims to provide advanced study in key issues related to climate change and global warming, and how infrastructure will need to adapt.

The course links with the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and in particular the different indicators associated with SDG13 on Climate Action. The course is largely research and project-based but there is also a taught element to it.

This course is designed to cater mainly for graduates with an engineering education, and employees of public and private sector companies who wish to upgrade their skills to be able to tackle the complex issues relating to the current climate crisis, circular economy goals, and the design of engineering options for mitigating environmental impacts and promoting sustainable development.

The course is ideal for you if:

  • you’re looking for an alternative to an MSc
  • you’re interested in carrying out shorter research projects
  • you wish to tailor your studies to suit your own research interests and career objectives

An MRes takes one year full-time or two years part-time to complete. Part-time study is only available to UK students.

You can also study this course part-time through online distance learning, over 36 months, offering a flexible mode of study (starting academic year 2020-21).

What you’ll study

This degree combines a number of subjects including:

  • climate change
  • sustainability
  • circular economy
  • air pollution
  • human health
  • environmental impact assessment (EIA)
  • strategic environmental assessment (SEA)

You’ll complete six taught modules. Four classes are compulsory and you then choose two optional.

Work placement

As part of the class Independent Study in Collaboration with Industry, you can apply to work with industry projects. One of the projects is the Carbon Clinic. This is an innovative collaborative project between the Carbon Trust and the University. It aims to provide support to small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) to reduce their carbon footprint and give you practical experience on environmental responsibilities within a business.

Apply here.

Application deadline: August 2020

MRes Climate Change Adaptation – University of Strathclyde, Glasgow

Opportunity type: Postgraduate research
Organisation: University of Strathclyde, Glasgow
Location: Glasgow, UK or online distance learning
Application Deadline: August 2020
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Why this course?

This one-year research-led MRes in Geo-environmental Engineering is suitable if you’re looking for an alternative to an MSc or are interested in carrying out shorter research projects and wish to tailor your studies to suit your own research interests and career objectives. The MRes is suitable for students interested in Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS).
We have strong industrial links. An active Industrial Advisory Board which contributes to curriculum design and the overall student experience.

An MRes takes one year full-time or two years part-time to complete. Part-time study is only available to UK students.

You can also study this course part-time through online distance learning, over 36 months, offering a flexible mode of study.

What you’ll study

This degree combines a number of subjects including:

  • geotechnics
  • microbiology
  • chemistry
  • hydrogeology

You’ll complete six taught modules – four compulsory classes and two optional.

Apply here.

Application deadline: August 2020