Jobs and Opportunities

Research Associate in Gas-Solid Reactors applied to Steel Industry – University of Manchester

Opportunity type: Post-doctoral Research Associate
Organisation: University of Manchester
Location: Manchester, UK
Application Deadline: Thursday 2nd April 2020
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Duration: 2 years, with the possibility to extend for a further 2 years

Number of places: 1

Location: Manchester, UK

We are seeking to recruit a Research Associate to work under the supervision of Dr. Vincenzo Spallina in the School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science of the University of Manchester. The aim of this project is to carry out the techno-economic assessment of the integrated calcium and chemical looping process using the gases from the primary steelwork and compare it with existing processes. The project combines numerical modelling and process design integration using software such as Aspen Plus. The project is initially for 2 years with the possibility to extend the contract for additionally 2 more years.

You should already hold or be nearing completion of a PhD/DPhil in chemical engineering, energy engineering, focused on reactor design and process development with proven experience in advanced reactor modelling, knowledge on gas-solid reactions and catalysis. Previous experience on chemical and calcium looping technology are desirable and particularly welcome.

The School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science (CEAS) at the University of Manchester is a world leading school playing a key role in the UK catalysis and process integration landscape. The School is committed to Athena SWAN principles to promote women in science and engineering. The University of Manchester values a diverse workforce and welcomes applications from all sections of the community.

http://www.ceas.manchester.ac.uk/about-us/athena-swan/

Enquiries about the vacancy, shortlisting and interviews:
Name: Dr Vincenzo Spallina
Email: vincenzo.spallina@manchester.ac.uk

General enquiries:
Email: hrservices@manchester.ac.uk
Tel: 0161 275 4499

Technical support:
Email: universityofmanchester@helpmeapply.co.uk
Tel: 0161 850 2004

This vacancy will close for applications at midnight on the closing date.

Please see the link below for the Further Particulars document which contains the person specification criteria.

Closing date for receipt of applications: Friday 22nd May 2020

Apply here

Carbon geological storage: understanding micro-mechanisms of CO2 capillary breakthrough and localized pathways to assess caprock CO2 leakage hazard – University of Strathclyde

Opportunity type: PhD
Organisation: University of Strathclyde
Location: Strathclyde, UK
Application Deadline: Friday 22nd May 2020
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Duration: 4 years

Number of places: 1

Location: Strathclyde, Scotland, UK

The development of Carbon Capture and Storage will occur at global scale, and considering the amount of CO2 that will be captured and stored underground, long-term leakage of CO2 into the atmosphere is one of the most crucial concerns for CO2 repositories.

Eligibility

We are looking for a highly motivated person to undertake multidisciplinary research. Candidates who should have a good degree in a relevant science/engineering discipline.

Project details:

The development of Carbon Capture and Storage will occur at global scale, and considering the amount of CO2 that will be captured and stored underground, long-term leakage of CO2 into the atmosphere is one of the most crucial concerns for CO2 repositories. CO2 trapping potential of these geological repositories depends on the caprock’s low permeability to CO2. Recent field experiences have highlighted one major issue: CO2 moves through the caprock barrier much faster than expected. Several studies have suggested that this could be due to chemically-induced triggering of cracking in the clay rich rock, but previous studies have not been able to understand how the chemistry of the injected fluids may affect the micro-mechanics of the. Caprock is generally characterized by the elevated presence of clayey material. Water acidification and non-polarity of the CO2 irreversibly change the electrochemical interaction forces that dominating the clay particle configuration, which can both weaken the clay and cause it to shrink, hence, CO2 intrusion results in cracking of the caprock. Our previous research 1) showed the effect on clay microstructure for different pore water chemistries and 2) formulated a micromechanical conceptual model able to account for clay particle configuration changes caused by different chemistry of pore water (pH, fluid polarity and dielectric permittivity). This PhD studentship will focus on conducting the first micro-scale experimental investigations of crack initiation in clays, to characterize the cracking micro-mechanism occurring when exposed to CO2. Research in micro-mechanics of clayey geomaterials is lagging behind granular materials owing to the difficulty of investigating particle-to-particle interaction at the microscale. Even very basic responses observed in compression are not elucidated by basic microscale mechanisms. Characterisation of localized mechanisms such as crack initiation involves the understanding of the configuration of elements (particles) and the forces controlling the kinematics of such elements. Clay micromechanics (including the evolution of particle configuration in clays when subjected to mechanical loading) has rarely been investigated explicitly, although significant aspects of the pore space and particle configuration have been addressed by microscopic analyses such mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) testing. The proposed PhD represents an exciting opportunity to conduct fundamental research, with the prospect of having a significant impact on the assessment of the long-term CO2 trapping potential.

This PhD studentship focuses on a fundamental study on cracking mechanisms in clayey caprock upon CO2 exposure, with the aim of assessing caprock long-term sealing efficiency for CCS systems. CCS was identified by the Committee on Climate Change 2018 as the “the only way to decarbonise certain key industrial sectors” in the near future.

Supervisor
First Supervisor: Dr Matteo Pedrotti

2nd Supervisor: Prof Alessandro Tarantino, Prof Rebecca Lunn

Closing date for receipt of applications: Friday 22nd May 2020

Apply here

Research Assistant or Research Fellow – Cranfield University

Opportunity type: Research
Organisation: Cranfield University
Location: Cranfield, UK
Application Deadline: Wednesday 18th March 2020
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Fixed Term Contract until 31 March 2021

Flexible working will be actively considered

£30,600 per annum (Research Assistant) or £33,309 per annum (Research Fellow)

Location: Cranfield, Bedfordshire

Cranfield University Centre for Climate and Environmental Protection welcomes applications from researchers with expertise in thermochemical processes for the production of low carbon hydrogen, in particular the sorbent enhanced steam methane reforming process.

As the UK’s only exclusively postgraduate university, Cranfield’s world-class expertise, large-scale facilities and unrivalled industry partnerships is creating leaders in technology and management globally. Our distinctive expertise is in our deep understanding of technology and management and how these work together to benefit the world.

Our people are our most valuable resource and everyone has a role to play in shaping the future of our university, developing our learners, and transforming the businesses we work with. Learn more about Cranfield and our unique impact here: Working life at Cranfield.

Our shared, stated values help to define who we are and underpin everything we do: Ambition; Impact; Respect; and Community. To find out more please visit our website: https://www.cranfield.ac.uk/about/about

Cranfield’s expertise in energy and power covers a range of the potential energy solutions, from our ongoing relationship with oil and gas, to our developing reliance on renewable energy from the world around us. We are making a difference and making it possible to meet the needs of our population and industry while reducing our impact on the world.

You will have expertise in thermochemical processes for the production of low carbon hydrogen, in particular the sorbent enhanced steam methane reforming process, and be expected to work closely with the partners and contribute to the delivery of the research programme within this project. The impact of this project could be utterly revolutionary, because of this there is a commercial imperative to adhere to a Collaboration Agreement, which any researcher joining this project will need to agree to.

It is essential that you have extensive experience in designing, constructing and operating fluidised beds or other chemical reactors for high temperature, and preferably high pressure, processes.

You must have a PhD (obtained or near completion) in sorbent enhanced steam reforming or similar high temperature looping cycles (calcium / chemical looping) and a background in Chemical Engineering or another related discipline.

As this project will involve conducting research on a pilot plant it is essential that you understand the risks involved, and are comfortable and able to work safely and responsibly within a hazardous environment containing flammable and asphyxiating gases, superheated steam, high temperatures and high pressures.

You should also be comfortable using and troubleshooting analytical equipment. We would expect that you are comfortable working with Microsoft office suite as well as MATLAB (or python) for data analysis and has experience in preparing high quality figures and reports for publication and presentation.

In return, you will have exciting opportunities for career development in this key position, and to support world leading research and education, joining a supportive team and environment.

At Cranfield we value Diversity and Inclusion, and aim to create and maintain a culture in which everyone can work and study together harmoniously with dignity and respect and realise their full potential.  To further demonstrate our commitment to progressing gender diversity in STEM, we are members of WES & Working Families, and sponsors of International Women in Engineering Day.

We actively consider flexible working options such as part-time, compressed or flexible hours and/or an element of homeworking, and commit to exploring the possibilities for each role.  To find out more, please visit https://www.cranfield.ac.uk/about/working-at-cranfield/diversity

For an informal discussion, please contact, please contact Dr Peter Clough, Lecturer in Energy Engineering, on +44 (0)1234 754875 or (E) p.t.clough@cranfield.ac.uk

Apply online now at https://jobs.cranfield.ac.uk or contact us for further details on E: hr@cranfield.ac.uk or T: +44 (0)1234 750111 Ext. 4575. Please quote reference number 3308.

Closing date for receipt of applications: Wednesday 18 March 2020

Interviews to be held: Friday 03 April 2020

www.cranfield.ac.uk

Developing a constitutive model for rock fracture under hydraulic fatigue loading through XCT experiments University of Strathclyde, Glasgow

Opportunity type: PhD studentship
Organisation: University of Strathclyde, Glasgow
Location: Glasgow, UK
Application Deadline: 27th March 2020
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Project Details
This PhD will investigate the fracture behaviour of in-situ rocks subjected to fatigue induced by hydraulic pulses. Closed-loop direct/compact tensile experiments on rock under cyclic loads will be conducted. X-CT will be used to identify the microcracks or damage caused by fatigue under different loading levels. A constitutive model will then be developed to quantitatively define the relationship between the fracture behaviour of rocks and the hydraulic pulses. This work will enable accurate prediction of rock fracture under pulses and the simulated results will benefit a technology for well stimulation; making it more effective and environmental friendly.

The successful applicant will firstly design an experimental methodology and conduct the closed-loop direct/compact fatigue tensile tests on rocks. Stable and reliable results should be obtained and analysed for understanding the mechanism of rock degradation process under cyclic loads. X-ray CT equipment will be used to identify the fatigue crack characteristics during/after the mechanical tests. A fatigue fracture constitutive model will be proposed and parameterised by the experimental result.

How to apply
Apply via https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/research/civilenvironmentalengineering/

Application deadline:  27 March 2020

Pulsed fluid pumping for remediation of leakage from geological storage University of Strathclyde, Glasgow

Opportunity type: PhD studentship
Organisation: University of Strathclyde, Glasgow
Location: Glasgow, UK
Application Deadline: 28th March 2020
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Essential: The applicant should hold a minimum of an upper second class BSc Honours degree (or equivalent) in subjects relevant to Physical Sciences.Desirable: Additional experience or skills development relevant to geoscience or environmental engineering, such as modelling, structural geology, hydrogeology, CO2 storage.The ideal candidate should have a desire to work in an interdisciplinary, applications-focused field of recognised international importance in geoscience. They will be a practical self-motivated person who will lead the development and direction of their project. Applicants should hold (or expect to get) a minimum of an upper second-class honours degree or an MSc with distinction or high merit in physical sciences, maths, or a related field. They should have some programming experience in analytical languages such as MATLAB or R.Candidates with some prior research and/or work experience in the geological/structural/hydrological/modelling sciences will be given priority.Project Details

Geological energy (geoenergy) options such as CO2, hydrogen or compressed air energy storage and hydrogen or natural gas extraction are deemed fundamental to achieving the necessary transition to a low carbon future. To be effective, risks relating to geoenergy engineering activities must be characterised and managed. To date, most geoenergy research has focussed on robust selection, operation and monitoring approaches. Relatively little attention has been paid to developing effective remediation options in the case of geofluid leakage from depth to surface away from wellbores. Further, research has tended to focus on characterising flow at depth conditions relevant to storage (which tend to be deeper than 800 m below surface). This project will address these gaps by investigating pulsed flow for leakage remediation in the shallow subsurface.

Multiple possible pathways for unintended leakage to surface (or shallow subsurface) of geofluids (and associated additives or contaminants) have been identified, such as improperly sealed boreholes, or geological heterogeneities such as fault zones. Remediation techniques for the former are well known and studied but remediating migration away from wellbores is less well constrained. Leaked fluids may migrate towards the surface, where the fluid flow and the rock properties will be different from those at depth. In order to minimise negative social and environmental risks and impacts of geofluid leakage, surface release must be minimised or avoided. Remediation approaches could include either fluid extraction from newly drilled wells or the injection of fluids to clean-up (sweep, dissolve, disperse, breakdown) leaked geofluid and associated contaminants. Such injection will be influenced by the host rock properties and the pumping capabilities. This PhD will investigate the interplay between these factors.

The key research questions to be addressed are:

  • How does the flow behaviour of geoenergy fluids through (fractured) porous media change from depth towards the earth surface?
  • How is the flow of geoenergy fluids (e.g. CO2, geothermal brine) through (fractured) porous media influenced by pulsed fluid flow?
  • Can remediation of geoenergy fluids be improved through pulsed or steady injection of fluids into shallow subsurface?
  • How can pulsed fluid remediation technology be integrated into geoenergy site selection and monitoring programs?

Supervisor

The student would work with Dr Jen Roberts and Dr Gareth Johnson in the world-leading Centre for Ground Engineering and Energy Geosciences within the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Strathclyde, and Dr Katriona Edlmann in the School of Geosciences at the University of Edinburgh. The Applied Geoscience Laboratory lab has sophisticated state of the art laboratory facilities capable of recreating the in-situ conditions of temperature, pressure and geochemistry along with multiphase fluid flow for depths up to 4km.

How to apply

Apply via https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/research/civilenvironmentalengineering/

Application deadline:  28 March 2020

Earthquake-proofing of a new well stimulation technology University of Strathclyde, Glasgow

Opportunity type: PhD studentship
Organisation: University of Strathclyde, Glasgow
Location: Glasgow, UK
Application Deadline: 27th March 2020
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Candidates should have a related background in geosciences, geomechanics or engineering, basic knowledge of computer programming, ability and willingness to learn new software and computational skills, be comfortable with international travel and working as members of a team.
Project Details

This PhD project looks into the short and long-term impact that an emerging technology for well stimulation (pulsed injection) has on the rock and subsurface relative to induced seismicity. More specifically, it focuses on the dissipation of the pore-pressure wave generated by an injection pulse through the rock, the extent of the affected area and the time that any impact from this pulse and generated pore-pressure wave front will take to become insignificant. Outcomes of this research could inform future injection strategies to minimise induced seismicity within a predefined range in magnitude and space.

Supervisor

The successful candidate will benefit from supervision by a multidisciplinary team: Dr Stella Pytharouli, Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Strathclyde (UK) and Dr Ryan Pollyea, Geosciences, Virginia Tech. (US)

How to apply

Apply via https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/research/civilenvironmentalengineering/

Application deadline:  27 March 2020

MRes Geo-environmental Engineering- University of Strathclyde, Glasgow

Opportunity type: Postgraduate research
Organisation: University of Strathclyde, Glasgow
Location: Glasgow, UK or online distance learning
Application Deadline: August 2020
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Why this course?

This one-year MRes in Climate Change Adaptation aims to provide advanced study in key issues related to climate change and global warming, and how infrastructure will need to adapt.

The course links with the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and in particular the different indicators associated with SDG13 on Climate Action. The course is largely research and project-based but there is also a taught element to it.

This course is designed to cater mainly for graduates with an engineering education, and employees of public and private sector companies who wish to upgrade their skills to be able to tackle the complex issues relating to the current climate crisis, circular economy goals, and the design of engineering options for mitigating environmental impacts and promoting sustainable development.

The course is ideal for you if:

  • you’re looking for an alternative to an MSc
  • you’re interested in carrying out shorter research projects
  • you wish to tailor your studies to suit your own research interests and career objectives

An MRes takes one year full-time or two years part-time to complete. Part-time study is only available to UK students.

You can also study this course part-time through online distance learning, over 36 months, offering a flexible mode of study (starting academic year 2020-21).

What you’ll study

This degree combines a number of subjects including:

  • climate change
  • sustainability
  • circular economy
  • air pollution
  • human health
  • environmental impact assessment (EIA)
  • strategic environmental assessment (SEA)

You’ll complete six taught modules. Four classes are compulsory and you then choose two optional.

Work placement

As part of the class Independent Study in Collaboration with Industry, you can apply to work with industry projects. One of the projects is the Carbon Clinic. This is an innovative collaborative project between the Carbon Trust and the University. It aims to provide support to small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) to reduce their carbon footprint and give you practical experience on environmental responsibilities within a business.

Apply here.

Application deadline: August 2020

MRes Climate Change Adaptation – University of Strathclyde, Glasgow

Opportunity type: Postgraduate research
Organisation: University of Strathclyde, Glasgow
Location: Glasgow, UK or online distance learning
Application Deadline: August 2020
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Why this course?

This one-year research-led MRes in Geo-environmental Engineering is suitable if you’re looking for an alternative to an MSc or are interested in carrying out shorter research projects and wish to tailor your studies to suit your own research interests and career objectives. The MRes is suitable for students interested in Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS).
We have strong industrial links. An active Industrial Advisory Board which contributes to curriculum design and the overall student experience.

An MRes takes one year full-time or two years part-time to complete. Part-time study is only available to UK students.

You can also study this course part-time through online distance learning, over 36 months, offering a flexible mode of study.

What you’ll study

This degree combines a number of subjects including:

  • geotechnics
  • microbiology
  • chemistry
  • hydrogeology

You’ll complete six taught modules – four compulsory classes and two optional.

Apply here.

Application deadline: August 2020

Technology Development Lead (Greenhouse Gas and Water) – Suncor

Opportunity type: Job opportunity
Organisation: Suncor
Location: Calgary, Canada
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“We know that the world needs urgent action to reduce our carbon emissions and avoid the worst effects of climate change and we recognize that ‘business as usual’ is not good enough, so we’ve set aggressive, yet achievable goals.” One of our core sustainability goals is to harness technology and innovation to reduce our GHG emission intensity by 30% by 2030.

Suncor’s greenhouse gas (GHG) and water technical team is looking for a creative problem-solver to develop new and disruptive technologies for low-GHG emitting electricity, heat, and hydrogen, as aligned with our corporate technology development strategy. In this role, you will collaborate with internal and external parties to develop the business case for initiating, managing and disseminating learnings from technology development projects!

We asked some of our employees why it’s important for Suncor to have a GHG goal. Click here to listen to what they had to say.

You will use your expertise to:

  • Assist in developing and preparing business cases for technology development activities in the areas of low-GHG intensity heat, power, and hydrogen
  • Support the advancement of technologies as per Suncor’s technology development standard
  • Synthesize technical reports documenting the identification, screening and evaluation of technologies
  • Influence our external innovation and research community to surface opportunities
  • Manage consultants and support and mentor employees with less experience to provide them with learning and development opportunities
  • Communicate with senior management and external partners during the execution of technology development activities
  • Focus on enterprise-wide technologies and identify deployment opportunities in existing and future assets outside of oil sands
  • Manage activities with a collective budget of up to $5 million annually

We’d like to review your application if you have…

Must-haves (minimum requirements):

  • Five years of experience in research and/or technology development, especially related to low-GHG intensity heat, power and hydrogen
  • Technical experience in low-GHG intensity technology
  • A University degree
  • A Master’s degree or PhD in Chemical/Process Engineering, Environmental (Chemical) Engineering, or another related discipline
  • Knowledge in at least one area of Process Systems Engineering (e.g., process design, integration, optimization)
  • A deep understanding of one or more process modelling software tools/environments (e.g., Aspen Plus, Hysys, Matlab, gPROMS)
  • Strong verbal and written communication skills, such as experience publishing in peer-reviewed journals and presenting research findings at conferences
  • Exceptional interpersonal skills, as collaboration with internal and external partners in the development of technology is essential
  • The ability to develop creative solutions for complex problems and deal successfully with ambiguity
  • Strong, tactful and collaborative non-authoritative leadership skills
  • Alignment with our values

Preference for:

  • Expertise in the development of novel flowsheets and the design, integration, optimization, and scale-up of industrial processes for CO2 capture
  • Experience in generation, distribution, and storage of hydrogen for use as an energy carrier for transportation
  • Expertise in design, integration, optimization, and scale-up of electrochemical cells

Where you’ll be working, your work schedule, and other important information:

  • You will work out of our Calgary head office, located in the Suncor Energy Centre at 150 – 6th Ave S.W. in Calgary, Alberta
  • Hours of work are a regular 40-hour work week, Monday to Friday
  • Relocation support will be provided
  • NOC code: 2134
  • Language of work: English
  • Wage: $110,000 – $150,000/year base salary
  • Benefits: annual incentive bonus, pension and savings plans, vacation plan, benefits plan, relocation services SAP:ENG

Why Suncor?

We are Canada’s leading integrated energy company with a business portfolio that includes oil sands development and upgrading, offshore oil and gas production, petroleum refining, and product marketing under the Petro-Canada brand. Our global presence offers rewarding opportunities for you to learn, contribute, and grow in a variety of career-building positions. We live by the value of safety above all else – do it safely, or don’t do it. Our strong track record of growth and a focus on sustainability mean tremendous potential for the future. Learn about our mission, vision and values.

In addition to rewarding job opportunities, we offer an attractive employee package, including:

  • Competitive base salary, compensation programs, and an annual incentive program
  • Flexible benefits package
  • Rewarding pension and savings plans

Stay connected to us:

We are an equal opportunity employer and encourage applications from all qualified individuals. We are committed to providing a diverse and inclusive work environment where every employee feels valued and respected. We will consider accessibility accommodations to applicants upon request. Check out our social goal to learn how we are working to build greater mutual trust and respect with the Indigenous Peoples in Canada.

 

Apply here.