Research

The UKCCSRC, for the funding phase 2017 – 2022 is supporting a series of CCS research projects led by our core research team.
The core research has three linked themes: storage, capture and systems and policy.

Capture projects
The capture theme focuses on next generation CO2 capture technologies and processes, including high and low temperature solids-based cycles, and links closely to the systems work.

Storage projects
The research topics within the storage theme include pressure migration and plume migration within storage reservoirs with impacts for geomechanical security, plume stability and site monitorability.

Systems and policy projects
The systems and policy theme looks at UK-wide systems, linking demand for heat and power, energy markets, industrial demand, and CO2 transport infrastructure. The overall objective is to provide inputs into existing UK energy systems modelling. We also examine “social license to operate” for fossil-fired CCS as well as bio-energy with CCS (BECCS).

Enabling research

Since our creation in 2012, we have supported, strengthened and integrated the UK CCS community. The excellence of the UK research base is internationally recognised, with many of our 300+ academic members collaborating with CCS organisations across the world. We have become a vital link with industry, aligning CCS research with business needs to secure an attainable economic future for the technology.

Flexible funds

We opened our 2020 call for flexible funding in December 2019. Applications are now closed and applicants can expect outcomes by Tuesday 14th April 2020.

2012–2017 projects

During 2012 – 2017 the Centre issued two flexible funding calls that supported a total of 27 projects. These multidisciplinary CCS research projects sought to address gaps in knowledge and contribute to the commercialisation of CCS.

The UKCCSRC had £4.5 million in flexible funding to use to support CCS research. The projects addressed gaps in knowledge and contributed to the commercialisation of carbon capture and storage (CCS).  Thirteen UK universities and research institutions were involved in research delivery, and key project outcomes are publicly available.

The outputs from these projects can be found on our Data and Information Archive.

Our core research team

Prof Ben Anthony

Prof Ben Anthony

Prof Phil Bowen

Prof Phil Bowen

Dr Solomon Brown

Dr Solomon Brown

Dr Kyra Sedransk Campbell

Dr Kyra Sedransk Campbell

Dr Hannah Chalmers

Dr Hannah Chalmers

Prof Paul Fennell

Prof Paul Fennell

Dr Karen Finney

Dr Karen Finney

Prof Paul Dodds

Prof Paul Dodds

Dr Stuart Gilfillan

Dr Stuart Gilfillan

Dr Clair Gough

Dr Clair Gough

Prof Stuart Haszeldine

Prof Stuart Haszeldine

Dr Sam Krevor

Dr Sam Krevor

Dr Sarah Mander

Dr Sarah Mander

Prof Hao Liu

Prof Hao Liu

Dr Mathieu Lucquiaud

Dr Mathieu Lucquiaud

Prof Lin Ma

Prof Lin Ma

Prof Niall Mac Dowell

Prof Niall Mac Dowell

Dr Richard Marsh

Dr Richard Marsh

Dr Jerome Neufeld

Dr Jerome Neufeld

Dr Camille Petit

Dr Camille Petit

Prof Mohamed Pourkashanian

Prof Mohamed Pourkashanian

Dr Julia Race

Dr Julia Race

Dr David Reiner

Dr David Reiner

Dr Stuart Scott

Dr Stuart Scott

Prof Nilay Shah

Prof Nilay Shah

Prof Goran Strbac

Prof Goran Strbac

Prof Meihong Wang

Prof Meihong Wang

Dr Gareth Williams

Dr Gareth Williams

Mr John Williams

Mr John Williams

Prof Ben Anthony

Ben Anthony, Cranfield University, is currently Professor in Energy Process Systems at Cranfield University, and was a senior research scientist with Natural Resources Canada. 220+ journal papers, co-editor of the 1st book on Pressurized Fluidised Beds and (with PF) a book on high temperature looping cycles.

Prof Phil Bowen

Phil Bowen, Director of Cardiff University’s Research Institute in Energy Systems (ESURI), and Gas Turbine Research Centre (GTRC), specialises in combustion and thermofluid system simulation and measurement.

Dr Solomon Brown

Solomon Brown, University of Sheffield, was awarded the Frank Lees Medal 2009 by the IChemE. Since 2011 he has authored over 31 peer reviewed publications.

Dr Kyra Sedransk Campbell

Kyra Sedransk Campbell, Imperial College London, is a Royal Society - EPSRC Dorothy Hodgkin Research Fellow working on materials degradation and decomposition.

Dr Hannah Chalmers

Hannah Chalmers, Univeristy of Edinburgh, has unique expertise in CCS operational integration, network leadership and ECR mentoring.Communicating CCS to non-specialistsCarbon capture and storage is currently a "hot topic". I am one of a number of researchers at the University who devotes some of their time to helping non-specialists (policy-makers, journalists...) improve their understanding of this technology. I also participate as a 'technology expert' in research projects led by non-specialists (e.g. an ongoing UK Energy Research Centre project exploring potential development pathways for CCS).Power plant and CO2 capture engineeringWorking with colleagues in the Institute for Materials and Processes, I have been contributing to improved understanding of likely power plant performance with CO2 capture since I started work on CCS in 2004. In 2010, I was sole author for a review report commissioned by the IEA Clean Coal Centre on operating options available to power plants with CO2 capture. Much of my previous and ongoing work in this area focusses on flexible operation of power plants with CO2 capture.CO2 pipeline design and operationSuccessful CCS projects will need effective solutions for transporting captured carbon dioxide to safe geological storage. Some of my work is contributing to improved understanding of how CO2 transport infrastructure could be developed and operated successfully.Techno-economic analysis of CCS in electricity systemsDeveloping effective engineering solutions typically requires a good understanding of a range of non-technical issues. Much of my work is, therefore, interdisciplinary. In particular, I have developed methods for screening analysis of different operating options for power plants with CO2 capture taking into account economic, as well as technical, considerations. Ongoing work is extending these methods to include more detailed consideration of CO2 transport networks.Opportunities and challenges for CCS in developing countriesA number of researchers at the University of Edinburgh are contributing to efforts to determine if and how it could be appropriate to use CCS in developing countries. For example, in 2009 I co-authored a report that investigated the prospects for CCS technology in India with Rudra Kapila (see http://www.geos.ed.ac.uk/sccs/india-ccs-prospects.html).

Location

Univeristy of Edinburgh

Prof Paul Fennell

Paul Fennell (Deputy Director Capture) was joint director of ICL’s Centre for CCS. He has edited one book on high-temperature looping cycles, has 60 papers, 2 patents and is the 2015 winner of the IChemE’s Ambassador prize.

Dr Karen Finney

Karen is a senior research fellow at the University of Sheffield in the University Energy Institute, with expertise in the thermal treatments (combustion, gasification and pyrolysis) of fossil fuels, biomass and waste; carbon capture; pollutant monitoring; gas turbines; and combined heat and power. At the national ERDF-funded Translational Energy Research Centre, she is the theme manager for sustainable and low-carbon energy; here, she is the academic operator for the gas turbines, biomass gasifier, biodiesel engine and the metal emissions monitoring laboratory. She has been part of various consortia to be awarded research funding, totalling ~£20m. Karen is a Chartered Engineer, a Member of the Energy Institute, an invited committee member of the IChemE Clean Energy Special Interest Group and a co-opted specialist on the IFRF Council.

Location

University of Sheffield

Prof Paul Dodds

Paul Dodds is Professor of Energy Systems at University College London. He specialises in energy systems modelling and leads the development of the UK TIMES model, which is used by the UK Government to provide evidence for their long-term decarbonisation strategy. CCS is an important part of energy system models and Paul has recently focused on improving the representation of CCS for hydrogen production and industrial plants. He also leads UCL's contribution to a NERC-funded project examining negative emission technologies, in which CCS plays an important role for bioenergy with CCS (BECCS) and direct air capture (DAC).

Dr Stuart Gilfillan

Stuart Gilfillan is currently a Senior Lecturer in Geochemistry in the School of GeoSciences, at University of Edinburgh. He was educated in Earth Science at the University of Glasgow (BSc) and Geology at the University of Manchester (PhD), and has 14 years’ of post-PhD experience of innovative geochemical research in CO2 storage for CCS. This research has developed a means of fingerprinting carbon dioxide in order to track its movement and means of storage in subsurface reservoirs, as part of efforts to develop carbon capture and storage technologies. More recently, he has applied his expertise to the emerging GeoEnergy sector through novel monitoring of unconventional gas extraction, geothermal energy, CO2 contamination in, and connectivity of, hydrocarbon fields. He has a keen interest in all areas of utilising the subsurface for energy production or storage, and he is currently Deputy Programme Director for the GeoEnergy MSc course at Edinburgh, which he co-developed.

Location

Univeristy of Edinburgh

Dr Clair Gough

Clair Gough is a Senior Research Fellow at the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research at the University of Manchester. With a focus on CCS and biomass energy with CCS (BECCS). Clair has extensive experience in energy-related social scientific research, including expert elicitation processes, public attitudes and responses, and ethical assessment, as well as integrated socio-technical assessments. Clair’s research aims to better understand social, technical and climate implications of CCS and its role in achieving net zero. Her current research includes analysis of the conditions for establishing a social license to operate decarbonisation and carbon removal technologies, including CCS and BECCS.

Prof Stuart Haszeldine

Stuart Haszeldine is from the University of Edinburgh. Stuart has 25 years’ experience working with subsurface information from basin-scale to field-scale in hydrocarbon extraction and in waste disposal.  He was awarded the Scottish Science Prize in 1999, and elected Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 2003.  Since 2005 he has created the UK's largest University group examining CO2 storage geology, with a particular focus on natural analogues and seepage processes through overburden. He is currently co-leader of the Scottish Centre for Carbon Storage, lead scientist on COstorage for the UK Energy Research Centre, and co-leader of the academic network UKCCSC.  He served as advisor to the 2005-6 UK Parliament Science and Technology Committee on CO2 capture and storage.  Several pieces of evidence have been submitted to UK government consultations on CCS.

Dr Sam Krevor

Sam Krevor, Imperial College London,  is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Earth Science & Engineering. He is the Principal Investigator for the subsurfaceCO2 Group at Imperial College London. Their work is focused on the migration and trapping of CO2 in the subsurface, and limitations from plume migration and pressurisation to the CO2 storage capacity.

Location

Imperial College London

Dr Sarah Mander

Sarah Mander, University of Manchester, focuses on climate change mitigation and researches renewable energy, long term energy scenarios, sustainable energy in the urban environment, recycling and climate change governance.

Prof Hao Liu

Hao Liu, University of Nottingham, has 25 years’ research experience in CCS, combustion, power plant engineering and fluidised beds.

Location

Univeristy of Nottingham

Dr Mathieu Lucquiaud

Mathieu Lucquiaud, University of Edinburgh, is a Royal Academy of Engineering Research Fellow working on power generation systems with CO2 capture, operational flexibility and solvent post-combustion capture.

Location

Univeristy of Edinburgh

Prof Lin Ma

Lin Ma is Professor of Fluid Dynamics in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, the University of Sheffield. His active areas of research include gas/coal/biomass combustion, fuel related ash deposition, slagging and fouling in power plant furnaces, oxyfuel and solvent based carbon capture processes, rotating packed bed capture technologies, wind turbine aerodynamics and fuel cell technologies. He has worked for many years on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling of various energy processes and a wide range of industrial fluid flow, heat and mass transfer problems. He has co-authored over 200 peer reviewed papers.

Prof Niall Mac Dowell

Niall Mac Dowell is a Professor in Energy Systems Engineering at Imperial College London. He is a Chartered Engineer, a Fellow of both the IChemE and the Royal Society of Chemistry. His research is focused on understanding the transition to a low carbon economy. Since 2010, he has published more than 100 peer-reviewed scientific papers at the molecular, unit operation, integrated process, and system scales in this context. His work has been presented more than 100 times at conferences in the UK, EU, North America, Middle and Far East. A full list of publications can be found here and he currently serves on the Advisory Board of Joule.Niall has more than a decade’s experience as a consultant to the public and private sectors. He has worked with a range of private sector energy companies, and has provided evidence to members of the Select Committee on Energy and Climate Change and has given advice to DECC/BEIS, the IEA, the IEAGHG the ETI and the JRC. Niall is a member of Total’s Scientific Advisory Board, was also a member of the US National Petroleum Council (NPC) CCUS Roadmap Team. Niall has been a member of the technical working group of the Zero Emissions Platform (ZEP), the Carbon Capture and Storage Association (CCSA) and from 2015 – 2019 served as the Secretary of the IChemE's Energy Centre. He was awarded the Qatar Petroleum Prize for his work on Clean Fossil Fuels in 2010 and the IChemE’s Nicklin medal for his work on low carbon energy in 2015.

Location

Imperial College London

Dr Richard Marsh

Richard Marsh, Cardiff University, expertise includes methane oxycombustion for capture ready power plants, power plant flexibility and use of alternative fuels and swirl combustion processes.

Location

Cardiff University

Dr Jerome Neufeld

Jerome Neufeld is a Reader in Earth and Planetary Fluid Dynamics at the University of Cambridge appointed at the BP Institute, the Department of Earth Sciences and the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics.  The work of his group combines models of the fluid dynamics of geological CO2 storage with geophysical data sets to understand the migration and trapping of CO2 in the subsurface, with a particular and current focus on the role of mesoscale geological heterogeneities on the distribution and stabilisation of sequestered CO2.

Dr Camille Petit

Dr Camille Petit is a Reader in the Department of Chemical Engineering at Imperial College London, which she joined in September 2013. She currently leads the Multifunctional Materials Laboratory.Her research focuses on elucidating the fundamentals of porous materials formation, structure, and chemistry to exploit them in interfacial applications, i.e. separation of molecules (incl. CO2 capture) and solar fuel production. Her work also investigates the implications of using these materials at the large-scale. Materials of interest include metal-organic frameworks (MOFs)- and nitride-based materials. Dr Petit has published > 70 peer-reviewed articles. She has one granted patent and has filed two others, all related to the development of sorbent materials.Dr Petit is the recipient of the 2020 RSC Barrer Award,  2019 Philip Leverhulme Prize in Engineering, 2019 ERC Starting Grant, the 2017 AIChE’s 35 under 35 award, the 2017 IOM3 Silver Medal and the 2015 IChemE Sir Frederick Warner medal.

Prof Mohamed Pourkashanian

Professor Mohamed Pourkashanian is the Head of Energy Institute at the University of Sheffield, the Managing Director of the Translational Energy Research Centre and the General Secretary of International Flame Research Foundation (IFRF).As a Professor of Energy Engineering he has completed numerous major research projects on clean energy technology and has received substantial grants from partners such as the EU, NATO, industrial partners and RCUK-EPSRC. He is a member of several international and national scientific bodies e.g., All Party Parliamentary Renewable Transport Fuels Group, member of ISCF-Industrial Decarbonisation Advisory Group, and is Chair of the International Test Centre Network (ITCN). Professor Pourkashanian led the establishment of the Pilot-scale Advanced Capture Technology (PACT) national facilities in 2012 and has been the Executive Director of PACT for the past 6 years. He has published more than 474 refereed research papers and co-authored four books. At the Translational Energy Research Centre, Professor Pourkashanian provides expert academic, strategic and operational leadership to the project and its team members, directly contributing to all ongoing activity.

Dr Julia Race

Julia Race is a member of the Centre's Coordination Group and is the Research Area Champion for Transport.Julia has recently moved to the University of Strathclyde from Newcastle University to take up a role a Senior Lecturer in Pipeline and Subsea Engineering. She previously worked for over 20 years in the power generation, chemical, refinery and pipeline industries. She has spent 7 years managing recent academic research in CCS as principal investigator on the MATTRAN research project and the National Grid sponsored COOLTRANS project and as a co-investigator on the EPSRC UK CCS Consortium project. She is a member of the co-ordination group for the UK CCS Research Centre and Research Area Champion for CO2 transport and is a member of the BSI Committee PSE/265 Carbon Capture and Storage and the ISO TC 265:WG2 ‘CO2 transportation’. She also holds an EPSRC Industrial CASE studentship in CCS related research. Julia’s publications in the area of CCS transport include two book chapters, an IEAGHG report, four peer-reviewed conference papers and one published journal paper.Prior to moving to the university, Dr Race worked in the pipeline industry for 7 years as an integrity consultant for PII Pipeline Solutions. In this role, she was responsible for providing fitness-for-purpose, remaining life and corrosion assessments for onshore and offshore pipelines. Dr Race has also worked as a materials engineer in the petrochemical and power generation industries involved with the operation, maintenance and design of chemical and power plant. Her other research interests include modelling external corrosion in pipelines and evaluating the effect of denting on pipeline integrity.

Dr David Reiner

David Reiner is Deputy Director for Systems and Policy of the UKCCSRC.  David is University Senior Lecturer in Technology Policy at Judge Business School, University of Cambridge and Assistant Director of the Energy Policy Research Group (EPRG) at Cambridge. He is one of two academic members of the CCUS Council, which is chaired by the UK Energy Minister and co-chair of the BEIS Oversight Panel on Public Perceptions of CCUS. He is also on the Advisory Boards of the £180m Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund (ISCF) on Industrial Decarbonisation Challenge, the International Energy Agency Greenhouse Gas Programme’s Social Research Network and the UK-China Guangdong CCUS Centre.

Dr Stuart Scott

Stuart Scott works on high temperature fuel conversion and capture processes. He has led several multidisciplinary EPRSC-funded projects on aspects of high temperature looping for carbon capture.

Prof Nilay Shah

Prof Nilay Shah is a Professor in Process Systems Engineering at Imperial College London, where he currently is the Head of Department and formerly the Director of the Centre for Process Systems Engineering (CPSE), and a Chemical Engineer by training. He has co-authored over 300 technical papers on process systems modelling and engineering, design and optimisation of chemical and biochemical processes and low carbon energy supply chains and systems. Nilay Shah has received several awards and he is particularly interested in the transfer of technology from academia to industry. He was part of a team that recently developed a comprehensive report on greenhouse gas removal technologies (GGR). He is Deputy Chair of the RAEng Systems Approach to Decarbonisation Working Group and has just been appointed to the Energy Minister’s Hydrogen Advisory Council.

Prof Goran Strbac

Goran Strbac is a Professor of Energy Systems at Imperial College, with extensive experience in advanced modelling and analysis of operation, planning, security and economics of energy systems. He led the development of novel advanced analysis approaches and methodologies that have been extensively used to inform industry, governments and regulatory bodies about the role and value of emerging new technologies and systems in supporting cost effective evolution to low carbon energy future. Based on advanced whole-energy system modelling approach, he led extensive research that demonstrated significant importance and benefits of CCS technologies in future fully decarbonised UK energy system. He is currently Leading Author in IPCC WG 3, Member of the UK Smart System Forum, Member of the European Technology and Innovation Platform for Smart Networks for the Energy Transition, and Member of the Joint EU Programme in Energy Systems Integration of the European Energy Research Alliance.

Prof Meihong Wang

Meihong Wang is principal author of the most cited paper published in Chem. Eng. Res. Des. since 2010 (on post combustion carbon capture).Professor Wang joined the University of Sheffield in Sept. 2016 (with Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering & Energy2050).He was trained as Process Engineer in China, then moved to the UK in Jan. 1999 to join Imperial College London and University College London.He joined the University of Hull in Oct. 2012 as Reader in Process and Energy Systems Engineering & CCS after 6 years with Cranfield University as Lecturer and MSc Course Director.Professor Wang is a Chartered Engineer. He has published well over 100 technical (journal and conference) papers, and industrial reports. He has been involved in different research projects worth over £13 million from UK Research Councils. European Union and Industry as investigators (PI or CI).

Location

University of Sheffield

Dr Gareth Williams

Gareth currently works within the CO2 storage research team at the British Geological Survey, where he provides expertise in seismic data analysis, rock physics modelling and numerical simulation of CO2 flow in the subsurface.  He's published on a range of topics from deep subsurface structure to CCS, with a particular interest in the Sleipner CO2 injection operation. His current research is focused on the integrated modelling of fluid flow and time-lapse seismic response to monitor CO2 injection operations.

Mr John Williams

John is a senior geologist within the CO2 storage research team at the British Geological Survey. His expertise includes storage site characterisation and estimation of storage capacity. He has published on a range of topics relevant to CO2 storage on the UKCS, including pressure-limitations to CO2 storage capacity, the nature of the contemporary in situ stress state, and fault reactivation potential. He is currently engaged in research into the subsurface structure, properties and geomechanical constraints to the storage capacity of the Bunter Sandstone saline aquifer formation of the Southern North Sea.