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Written by Richard Graham , University of Nottingham, Principal Investigator on U KCCSRC Call 1 Project - Tractable equations of state for CO2 mixtures in CCS which completed in June 2014 A potential bottle-neck for Carbon Capture and Storage is CO 2 from power plants to the storage location, by pipeline. Key to safe and inexpensive transport is a detailed understanding of the physical properties of carbon dioxide. However, no gas separation process is 100% efficient, and the resulting carbon dioxide contains a number of different impurities. These impurities can greatly influence the physical properties of the fluid compared to pure CO 2 . They have important design, safety and cost implications for the compression and transport of carbon dioxide...Read more
By Dr Richard Graham , Lecturer in Applied Mathematics, University of Nottingham Principal Investigator on Call 1 Project - Tractable equations of state for CO2 mixtures in CCS: Algorithms for automated generation and optimisation, tailored to end-users Carbon capture and storage is a crucial technology in the international efforts to meet carbon dioxide emission targets. Capturing carbon dioxide from industrial sources can lead to a 90% reduction in emissions. However, no gas separation process is 100% efficient, and as a result the carbon dioxide generated contains a number of different impurities, depending on its source. These impurities can, depending on their composition and concentration, greatly influence the physical properties of the fluid compared to pure CO 2 . They have...Read more